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You have accessJournal of UrologyProstate Cancer: Detection & Screening II1 Apr 2016

PD09-08 SHOULD A MAN WITH A HISTORY OF BREAST CANCER BE SCREENED FOR PROSTATE CANCER?

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    INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES

    Male breast cancer is rare and its effect on risk of prostate cancer is as yet unclear. Our purpose is to characterize patients that developed prostate cancer after male breast cancer, in order to guide screening.

    METHODS

    We conducted a retrospective cohort study of men diagnosed with first primary invasive, stages I-III breast cancer between 1988 and 2012 in the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results Program and identified men who developed second primary prostate cancer. Standardized incidence ratios (SIR), exact 95% confidence intervals (CI) and excess risks were calculated overall and in stratified sub-analyses to estimate SIR by age group, race/ethnicity, breast cancer AJCC stage and hormone receptor status. Using Cox proportional hazards models, we calculated adjusted hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for risk of second primary prostate cancer, breast cancer-specific mortality and all-cause mortality.

    RESULTS

    5,753 men were diagnosed with first primary breast cancer. After a median follow up of 4.3 years, 250 second primary prostate cancers were diagnosed. Overall, the incidence of second primary prostate cancer was only slightly greater than expected (SIR=1.12, 95% CI 0.93-1.33) compared to a similarly aged general population but not statistically significant. Findings were suggestive of greater incidence of prostate cancer in men ages 65-74 years at index breast cancer (SIR=1.34, 95% CI 1.01-1.73), with AJCC stage I breast cancer (SIR=1.36, 95% CI 1.04-1.75) or hormone receptor-positive breast cancer (SIR=1.23, 95% CI 1.11-1.39).

    CONCLUSIONS

    This analysis suggests a possible association between male breast cancer and subsequent primary prostate cancer. Prostate cancer screening may be indicated in men with early stage breast cancer, hormone receptor positivity and those under 75.

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